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  about 3 months ago
I think the tobacco industry ran some similar studies. ;)
  about 3 months ago
[quote] Sean Carney 13 hours ago Excellent thread here. Enjoying it very much. I am so grateful that Ken answered because I knew that Dr. Carney was going to have a hard time answering any questions until November. She has some deadlines hanging over her head right now. Thanks, Y'all[/quote] Thanks Sean, but please - no one assume I speak for Dr. Carney or that I am an authority in any form. I'm just another member of this community sharing my experiences and what I have learned from them. Ken
  about 3 months ago
[quote] Denise Rose 19 hours ago Ken, can you elaborate on this point: "Animal sourced protein causes insulin resistance by a different mechanism from fat. Instead of directly inhibiting insulin, it inhibits your efficiency by damaging the endothelium cell lining of the blood vessels, reducing nutrient and oxygen transfer." [/quote] Hi Denise, That statement is actually a bit over broad for the context of the sentence. The issue actually goes far beyond the endothelium cells; basically, the whole body. Cell biology is actually quite complex with many interconnected elements. Insulin resistance is not solely limited to the insulin receptors and passing glucose into the cell is not the end of the line. Once glucose enters the cell, something has to be done with it. It must be metabolized (dissipated as energy). For that, the cell must be healthy in more ways than just insulin receptors. There are many elements within the cell that is responsible for that. One of which is the mitochondria. If there is an issue with the mitochondria or any of its support mechanisms, then it can't metabolize the glucose (or enough of it), so the end result is the same as fat induced insulin resistance, but the real issue in that case is cell health or cell damage. Inflammation is a very damaging process - often exaggerating the damage being inflicted by the offending agent. Importing cells from another animal is considered a hostile invader by the immune system prompting a rush to attack it. In the process, there is collateral damage - the cells we wish to keep. As you know, this process spreads inflammation throughout the body; some of which we are aware of such as arthritis and pimples and some we are not, such as coronary artery disease. There are also conditions that mimic insulin resistance, but is not actually related. Any sort of illness; viral, bacterial and even inflammation regardless of source prompts the liver and muscles to excrete glycogen into the blood stream. This is to be countered with an increase of insulin to increase metabolism for energy to fight the illness. This process, when taken to extreme results in fever as the body is burning fuel at an overwhelming rate in the effort. This appears as insulin resistance because of the very large insulin requirements for that level of energy production, but it isn't really insulin resistance. For me, fat induced insulin resistance is obvious when insulin requirements elevate, insulin/glucose control slide out of sync, onsets in 12-24 hours and lasts for 30 days. Conditions like illness requires huge doses of insulin, but it is still in sync and subsides as quickly as the illness, often abruptly. I hope this helps! Ken
  about 3 months ago
Yes,very close. Although any damage, even if not necessarily the insulin receptors will cause the cell to not function properly. So even if the glucose actually gets in, the cell still can't metabolize to do its job. Like if your car engine is damaged, it still won't work even if there is plenty of fuel in the tank. Note that if a person on a ketogenic diet adds carbohydrates to their diet, the ketones will diminish. Also note that if a person who has "cured" their diabetes with ketogenics eats a high glycemic meal, their blood-sugar will spike, meaning they are still diabetic.
  about 3 months ago
Hi Denise, Yes, the fat is actually leaving the cells with ketosis, but it's a matter of how it's leaving. imagine you have a box of contents and you want to remove some of the contents from the box. One way is to open the box and remove the specific contents. Another way could be to bash the box with a hammer until the contents are out, or you could dissolve the box with a solvent to get the contents out. The problem with the last two option leaves the box damaged. If you have cells that have been purged of fat by ketones or any other chemical solvent, they may no longer be inhibited by fat, but they are now inhibited by damage or killed entirely. They are still insulin resistant, because they are damaged such that they cannot fully function even if properly fueled.
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