• Denise Rose 19 hours ago

    Ken, can you elaborate on this point: "Animal sourced protein causes insulin resistance by a different mechanism from fat. Instead of directly inhibiting insulin, it inhibits your efficiency by damaging the endothelium cell lining of the blood vessels, reducing...



    Denise Rose 19 hours ago

    Ken, can you elaborate on this point: "Animal sourced protein causes insulin resistance by a different mechanism from fat. Instead of directly inhibiting insulin, it inhibits your efficiency by damaging the endothelium cell lining of the blood vessels, reducing nutrient and oxygen transfer."


    Hi Denise,
    That statement is actually a bit over broad for the context of the sentence. The issue actually goes far beyond the endothelium cells; basically, the whole body. Cell biology is actually quite complex with many interconnected elements. Insulin resistance is not solely limited to the insulin receptors and passing glucose into the cell is not the end of the line. Once glucose enters the cell, something has to be done with it. It must be metabolized (dissipated as energy). For that, the cell must be healthy in more ways than just insulin receptors. There are many elements within the cell that is responsible for that. One of which is the mitochondria. If there is an issue with the mitochondria or any of its support mechanisms, then it can't metabolize the glucose (or enough of it), so the end result is the same as fat induced insulin resistance, but the real issue in that case is cell health or cell damage.
    Inflammation is a very damaging process - often exaggerating the damage being inflicted by the offending agent. Importing cells from another animal is considered a hostile invader by the immune system prompting a rush to attack it. In the process, there is collateral damage - the cells we wish to keep. As you know, this process spreads inflammation throughout the body; some of which we are aware of such as arthritis and pimples and some we are not, such as coronary artery disease. There are also conditions that mimic insulin resistance, but is not actually related. Any sort of illness; viral, bacterial and even inflammation regardless of source prompts the liver and muscles to excrete glycogen into the blood stream. This is to be countered with an increase of insulin to increase metabolism for energy to fight the illness. This process, when taken to extreme results in fever as the body is burning fuel at an overwhelming rate in the effort. This appears as insulin resistance because of the very large insulin requirements for that level of energy production, but it isn't really insulin resistance. For me, fat induced insulin resistance is obvious when insulin requirements elevate, insulin/glucose control slide out of sync, onsets in 12-24 hours and lasts for 30 days. Conditions like illness requires huge doses of insulin, but it is still in sync and subsides as quickly as the illness, often abruptly.
    I hope this helps!

    Ken

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